STAR TREK, FIRST CONTACT

And did anyone mention those villains? Making their big-screen debut are the Borg, bad to the bone and proud of it. Part human, part synthetic (and realized with appropriate menace by costume designer Deborah Everton, these unstoppable high-tech zombies are not just making conversation when they tell their adversaries, "Resistance is futile."

KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC

The Borg, designed by Deborah Everton and Michael Westmore, are as horribly magical as gargoyles, and the semi-metallic queen harks back to Fritz Lang's silent classic "Metropolis" and its wicked female robot with her silver breasts and lewd wink

The Washington Post

DICK

However, where the film really shines is with its retro look at "Tricky Dick," Watergate and the early '70s era. While the late 1970s and the whole disco period have been countlessly portrayed in movies, it's not often that the years preceding that time get as much attention -- at least not recently.

Not only does this film remind audiences of the music before disco -- often to quite humorous extremes as we're treated to some fun and funky songs long since buried in our memories -- but the clothes -- recreated by costume designer Deborah Everton ("Star Trek: First Contact," "The Abyss") don't escape delightfuly unscathed...

NY Times

Wisely, the filmmakers waste no opportunity to find humor in the fads and styles of the early '70s since younger audiences may find them especially amusing. In any event, production designer Barbara Dunphy and costume designer Deborah Everton have the look of the era nailed down squarely without, thankfully, being heavy-handed or condescending about it--the very qualities Fleming himself avoids. "Dick" leaves you hoping it finds the audience it clearly deserves.

Los Angeles Times

Costume designer Deborah Everton does wonderful things with garments for the girls, who seem to have very full wardrobes. In fact, the whole movie looks fabulous, in the stylised but entirely appropriate way that made Married to the Mob, for instance, such a joy to look at.

Washington Post

Costume Designer Deborah Everton dresses the two girls in fine 1970's fashion. I'm almost sure I've seen Jan and Marcia in those pyjamas

Screen It

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Without knowing the Watergate story, viewers could find enjoyment in the performances of the two dizzy leads, and maybe marvel at the recreation of flower power fashions (costumes by Deborah Everton)

efilmcritic

THE IN-LAWS

Tech credits all shine, especially Deborah Everton's character-revealing costumes.

Hollywood Reporteer

horribly magical as gargoyles, and the semi-metallic queen harks back to Fritz Lang's silent classic "Metropolis" and its wicked female robot with her silver breasts and lewd wink

DICK

However, where the film really shines is with its retro look at "Tricky Dick," Watergate and the early '70s era. While the late 1970s and the whole disco period have been countlessly portrayed in movies, it's not often that the years preceding that time get as much attention -- at least not recently.

Screen It

.

Without knowing the Watergate story, viewers could find enjoyment in the performances of the two dizzy leads, and maybe marvel at the recreation of flower power fashions (costumes by Deborah Everton)

efilmcritic

THE IN-LAWS

Tech credits all shine, especially Deborah Everton's character-revealing costumes.

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